“Zurdo” Roizner, the drummer who gave rhythm to almost all genres, died

Enrique “Zurdo” Roiznerthe drummer with an extensive career who played with artists of the stature of Vinicius de Moraes, Frank Sinatra, Astor Piazzolla and Leandro “Gato” Barbieri and for years was a member of Kevin Johansen’s band, died at 84 years old due to a stroke.

The irreversible stroke that attacked Roizner last Thursday put an end on Sunday to a musical life as intense as it was renowned in which his personal and accurate touch was at the service of very different proposals: from Les Luthiers to Daniel Viglietti and from Mercedes Sosa to the Moscow Circus.

The instrumentalist born on December 14, 1939 in Buenos Aires, who was declared an Outstanding Personality of Culture by the Buenos Aires Legislature in August 2016, also He joined Anacrusa and groups led by bandoneon players Lepoldo Federico and Dino Saluzziin a clear example of his flexibility and talent for playing everything and with everyone.

In addition to his musical talent, the “Zurdo” he was known for his good humorand he was able to get along with both on stage when at the end of the 80s he joined La Banda Elástica, that group of jazz musicians that reinterpreted musical classics and included Ernesto Acher, Jorge Navarro, Hugo Pierre and Ricardo Lew, among others.

From Piazzolla to Sinatra, from Mercedes Sosa to Kevin Johansen, Roizner played with the most varied musicians.  Photo Diego Waldmann. From Piazzolla to Sinatra, from Mercedes Sosa to Kevin Johansen, Roizner played with the most varied musicians. Photo Diego Waldmann.

The musical present of Roizner, who with his drums went through a time where session musicians from record labels recorded with artists of very different genres, was also linked since 2002 to the Tango Orchestra of the City of Buenos Aires. And last April had received a tribute in the Jazzologia cycle.

Recognized as a drummer, however, his entry into music came with another instrument. “Yeah. My parents wanted me to study the violin, a historical instrument among the Jews. Basically, because it is easy to transport; So, when they had to flee from somewhere, they grabbed it and that was it. I started at five and studied until I was twelve. That’s when I realized that music wasn’t for me, and I switched to drums,” he said. featured his characteristic humor a few years ago Clarion.

On that occasion he also said that despite the years of studying, he continued to improve: “I am addicted to studying. Nowadays I study four hours a day. And at some point I studied up to eight or ten. But there comes a time when You have to stop physical activity.”

“All the musicians I played with marked me, but Astor blew my mind,” Roizner once said about Piazolla.“All the musicians I played with marked me, but Astor blew my mind,” Roizner once said about Piazolla.

Faced with such a rush through studios and stages, Roizner accumulated anecdotes and experiences of various kinds, such as having played on Frank Sinatra’s historic visit to Argentina in August 1981.

“That doesn’t have any meaning. What happened is that Palito hired Don Costa’s orchestra to play an hour longer than what Sinatra sang, because an hour of show for the $1,000 that the ticket cost was very little. But the Sinatra’s rhythm section refused to play with Costa because he had not called them to record ‘New York New York’. So, the producer here looked for a rhythm section, and that’s where I appeared. I say that all these cases occurred because “All the good musicians were busy, and they had to put someone in,” he recalled about that unusual episode.

He "Left handed"on the cover of one of Kevin Johansen's albums.El “Zurdo”, on the cover of one of Kevin Johansen’s albums.

Roizner, who was chosen by Johansen to illustrate the cover of his album “Mis Américas Vol. 1/2” (2016), also recorded and, to name just a portion of the collaborations made, with the duo Pastoral, Cuarteto Zupay, Cantoral , Saúl Cosentino, Beatriz Suárez Paz, Claudia Puyó for ?Del Oeste? (1984) and with his admired Domingo Cura in “Percussion in Argentine folklore” (1994).

The post first appeared on www.clarin.com

Leave a comment