see list of holidays and optional points

O 2024 calendar reserves national holidays that coincide with weekends, that is, it limits the opportunities for extended time off. Only three national holidays are expected to be amended in 2024.

This year, the Universal Fraternization Day (January 1st) fell on a Monday. The Passion of Christ, scheduled for March 29th, and the Proclamation of the Republic, on November 15th, will take place on two Fridays, which makes room for an amendment at the weekend.

In addition to national holidays, it is worth highlighting that Each state has its own commemorative dateswith additional opportunities for longer periods of rest for the population.

When is Carnival 2024?

In 2024, Carnival will fall in the middle of month of Februaryscheduled for the days 10, 11, 12 e 13counting Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday.

See the list of holidays in 2024

  • January 1st: Universal Fraternization (Monday);
  • March 29: Good Friday/Passion of Christ (Friday);
  • April 21: Tiradentes (Sunday);
  • May 1st: World Labor Day (Wednesday);
  • September 7: Independence of Brazil (Saturday);
  • October 12: Nossa Senhora Aparecida (Saturday);
  • November 2: All Souls’ Day (Saturday);
  • November 15: Proclamation of the Republic (Friday);
  • November 20: Black Consciousness (Wednesday)
  • December 25th: Christmas (Wednesday).
  • February 12: Carnival (Monday);
  • February 13: Carnival (Tuesday);
  • February 14: Ash Wednesday (Wednesday);
  • May 30: Corpus Christi (Thursday);
  • October 28: Public Servants Day (Monday).

What are the public holidays in Rio de Janeiro in 2024?

In Rio, in addition to national holidays, the Saint George’s Day, on April 23rd. Black Awareness Day, on November 20, is also celebrated by Rio residents. The date was marked as a holiday in only a few states in the country, it would be a municipal holiday in only 1,260 Brazilian cities. However, The law that makes National Zombie and Black Consciousness Day a national holiday, to be celebrated on November 20, was published in the Official Gazette of the Union in December 2023.

What are the public holidays in Belo Horizonte in 2024?

In Belo Horizonte, Our Lady of Boa Viagem Day, celebrated on August 15th, will fall on a Thursday. Our Lady of Conception Day, December 8th, will be on a Sunday. None of the state holidays open the possibility of amendment.

Praça Raul Soares, in the center of Belo Horizonte — Photo: Pedro Truffi / Getty Images
Praça Raul Soares, in the center of Belo Horizonte — Photo: Pedro Truffi / Getty Images

What are the public holidays in Brasilia in 2024?

The inhabitants of Brasília will not have the opportunity to extend holidays beyond the three national holidays already established. The city’s anniversary, celebrated on April 21st, coincides with the Tiradentes holiday, taking place on a Thursday. In turn, Evangelical Day, celebrated on November 30, will take place on a Saturday.

JK Memorial, one of Brasília's postcards, in the Federal District — Photo: Disclosure / Ministry of Tourism / Roberto Castro
JK Memorial, one of Brasília’s postcards, in the Federal District — Photo: Disclosure / Ministry of Tourism / Roberto Castro

What are the public holidays in Manaus and Salvador in 2024?

Em Manaus (AM)the birthdays of the state of Amazonas (September 5th) and the capital (October 24th) fall on Thursdays.

Already in Salvador (BA)the population should have another long holiday in 2024: Saint John’s Day, celebrated on June 24, falls on a Monday.

Ponta Negra, in Manaus — Photo: Disclosure/city hall
Ponta Negra, in Manaus — Photo: Disclosure/city hall

What are the 2024 public holidays in Porto Alegre?

Just like in Salvador, the inhabitants of Porto Alegre have the opportunity to enjoy another long holiday with the Day of Nossa Senhora dos Navegantes, on February 2nd. The date will occur on a Friday, providing the chance for an extended period of time off amended to the weekend.

Rua Gonçalo de Carvalho, in Porto Alegre (RS) — Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Rua Gonçalo de Carvalho, in Porto Alegre (RS) — Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The post first appeared on oglobo.globo.com

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